Category Archives: Search Engine Marketing

spotlight-search

Is Apple’s Spotlight Makeover A Sore Spot for Digital Marketers… And Google?

By | digital marketing, google, Search Engine Marketing | No Comments

Apple is clearly trying to break it’s addiction to Google products. After the Apple Maps debacle last year, it’s clear Apple is carving out a new battlefield in this war amongst tech giants–but this time it’s around search. This was one of the big takeaways from the WWDC conference on Monday–Apple is overhauling their operating system and taking center stage is ‘Search.’

Spotlight is now tied into the Safari browsing bar, when before it was Google. Spotlight isn’t hidden away in the top corner, it’s front and center on the screen with two simple keystrokes. As expected, Apple’s leaders got on stage to reveal all of this ‘awesome’ news and tout how they were the best.

But we’ve been down this road before. Apple announces a bunch of ‘awesome’ news, then the developers take it for a spin. Then the real world gets the software months later only to realize the use cases they presented on stage worked fine, but when you veer outside of those intended uses, things get dicey very quickly. This has been the case for many Apple software projects. Hello Siri… Or Apple Maps, or Mac.com before it was iCloud, or a number of other false starts (If you’re going to be on the edge of innovation, this stuff is going to happen).

Personally, I think Apple learned it’s lesson with Maps. But I also know how big the team of geniuses working on Search is at Google. So there’s bound to be disappointment. And make no mistake, this battle over search in OS X will have a real impact on digital advertising dollars.

As Apple weens us off Google and the browser bar for every query, we could see AdWords share of impressions decline. As Apple appears to be posed to squeeze search sessions from Google, it’s clear Google will be responding in-kind.

We can expect more independence and less collaboration from Apple and Google, and as a digital marketer, I see that as a backward step for our industry. As an Apple fan, I’m disappointed too.

So, what do you think? Will Apple’s new version of Spotlight (and disavowing Google in the search bar) be to the delight or detriment of users? Or will users even notice a difference? I think advertisers will.

beiber

Become a PLA “Belieber” with 360° Images

By | google, PPC, Search Engine Marketing | No Comments

360° Image capturing has been around and growing in popularity for some time now. We’d say it’s nearing its’ “teen celeb” years and is prime for a starring role in today’s advertising stage.

Shopping online can bring a consumer many steals and deals, but the one downfall is that you can’t really see or feel what the product is like unless you are willing or able to find a store near you. After many years of the Brick ‘N Mortar vs. the Online Shopper wars, 360° images will be coming to a search result page near you at a rapid pace in 2014 like your favorite teen heartthrob. A consumer will be able to find a full 360° product view on an advertiser’s website and in Google PLA’s!

PLA’s have grown in popularity and outpacing the previous generation of Google Ads and replacing them with Product Listing Ads that showcase an image, description, and price of the item you were searching for on Google.com or Google Shopping. And they don’t stop there. You’ll find these types of ads pulling information from a feed on Amazon, eBay, and more! If you haven’t already given PLA campaigns a try, get with the latest craze…YOLO.

What can you expect to see?

  • An increase in traffic for PLAs
  • A decrease in traffic for Text Ads
  • An increase in competition pushing CPCs up
  • A learning curve associated with non-keyword target campaigns and feed optimization

Once you are ready with solid campaigns, sign up with Google to use their 360° imaging. Create an account, include your product feed, and send them your products for scanning. Get ready for the screaming fans (conversions and interest) when you see your products spinning in the SERP’s. If you aren’t sick from all the sugar and cheesiness in this post, keep reading.

What kind of specs does the Google 360° program require?

  • Approved 360° account
  • Send all color variations of products
  • Don’t send over scratched or damaged packaging/products
  • No product labels allowed
  • Dimensions = 5” x 5” x 6” and 22” x 22” x 18”
  • Only products with a product page on Google Shopping should be sent
  • More depending on your product

Don’t get distracted by all the flashing lights and forget to create a shipment and upload your product feed in the process! How do you know if your products should be shipped? Check the status column in your account. If you complete all the shipping steps properly, an address will populate to send products to.

Google not to be outdone, has really stepped up their game for advertisers and this brand new feature will not disappoint consumers. Contact us – we’ll make you a PLA “Belieber” and have you singing “Like Baby, Baby, Baby, Oh!” in no time and maybe even make you our honorary “Boyfriend”!

gTLD

Generic Top Level Domains – Big Idea or Big Mistake?

By | digital marketing, ecommerce, Search Engine Marketing | No Comments

Generic top-level domains (gTLD) are hitting the internet today, 02/05. There are currently only 22 functioning gTLDs but that will soon change. There will be about 1,000 new names that will become available, which include .buy, .fashion, .retail, .luxury, .gift, .shoe and more. This will be the first time since 2004 that a more diverse way of categorizing on the Internet becomes available.

What are Generic -top level domains?

The extension visible at the end of a domain name – the “.com” in digitaloperative.com is the gTLD. .com, .org, .info, and .net are some of the core group of domain extensions. Anybody can create and start running new sites on these gTLDs.

Why are new gTLDs a good idea?

The internet is running out of space and business’ are struggling to find domain names that are available and suitable for their needs. With the new gTLD’s becoming available it means big branding opportunities for companies. Some blogs are speculating that this could be a big brand and SEO play.

What are the benefits of the new domains?

The biggest benefit of using new gTLD is increasing brand real estate. Companies will be able to purchase domains to individually brand products. Like Apple for example, if they purchase .apple they can have domains such as: ipad.apple, ipod.apple, mac.apple, etc. This will be a great way for companies to increase brand visibility and lead to easier search-ability.

What is the main arguement against the new domains?

People know .com and .net, but they don’t really know “.cars.” This confusion could lead to people typing in the domain names with an extra “.com” after the real web address and getting an error, or worse, directed to the wrong place.

How do I get started with gTLDs?

You can reserve your domain on a first come and first serve basis. With the vast number of domains becoming available, it will be less likely that your chosen domain will be reserved. If you’d like to consider leveraging gTLDs in your digital marketing plan, drop us a line.

Conversion Rate Optimization: A Systematic Approach

By | Search Engine Marketing | One Comment

As the digital realm continues to expand and e-commerce becomes a more common means of consumption, the sea of competitive websites will grow even larger. So how do you know if your website will outperform your competitor’s? The secret is in the optimistic acronym, CRO.

The multitude of options for online acquirement have created a very short tempered behavior prevalent amongst online shoppers. Considering how the rise of mobile shopping will only increase this decline of patience, you might begin to wonder how to convince visitors to commit to your site all the way through the research process and ultimately through checkout.

Before the flood of e-commerce sites, businesses could survive by focusing on acquisition. Increasing traffic had significant results on revenue generation as the visitors were limited by their options to shop elsewhere. In today’s market, there are so many digital purchasing platforms that businesses must shift toward retention focused objectives to stay competitive.

Once traffic hits a site it is imperative to do everything possible to increase the chance of converting those visits into sales. This process must merge a visitor’s past, present and future expectations with highly intuitive and navigable design features. The process does not condone cookie cutter techniques, but rather encourages a complete understanding of how your vertical functions and what your target demographic expects via competitive analysis.

This is the first step in an ongoing process called Conversion Rate Optimization. While blind adjustments might reveal micro gains, we have found that a systematic approach leveraging information can help develop a strategic vantage point when implementing alternative solutions.  After thorough analysis of your market and target demographics via research and surveys, you should consider how your site has been performing by studying its analytics and sales records. If your site is properly tracked, you might find some very revealing information.

Once you have identified your site’s strengths and weaknesses you will be ready to implement business objectives and goals into scripted off site user tests for unbiased feedback. The micro goal here is to further identify strengths and weaknesses in your site’s navigation and overall flow. After analysing the user tests you should have solid focal points for A/B testing.

My suggestion for strong A/B and multivariate testing would be to reanalyze the entire picture after everything you have learned along the way. Your original thoughts and predictions concerning the project may have changed significantly, but this is a good thing so embrace it. In an unpredictable era, you must question assumptions and cater to evolving visitors. So test.

Programs featuring WYSIWYG website editing software with integrated analytics have changed the game. Those of us who lack fluency in code now have the power to test site redesigns with tracked goals and analytics from live portions of traffic. Be sure to consolidate steps, remove barriers and provide useful information to facilitate their shopping experience.

One of the greatest thrills of working with the Strategy Team at Digital Operative has been to see this process come to life. There is no better feeling than to tell a client you have improved their conversion rate and increased their revenue. When it comes to CRO, the process simply continues. As Winston Churchill said, “to improve is to change; to perfect is to change often”.

Conversion Rate Optimization will always be crucial to digital strategy. Those who approach it with a balance of art and science should have the best foundation to implement incredibly innovative solutions. By focusing on demographic behavior and intuitive design, while intelligently testing with visitor and business objectives in mind, your site will transgress from adapt to survive to e-flourish and thrive.

Erik Davignon was DOs Summer Strategy Intern

Spring is Here and Kenshoo is in the Air

By | Search Engine Marketing | 2 Comments

I’ve read some bold promises from marketing automation software throughout the years. They all seem to promise the same thing… sit back, relax and let our little bot make you look like the rock star of the marketing department. Sayings like, ‘it’s cheaper, it’s faster, it’s easier, it’s more profitable become commonplace in every sales pitch.

I’ve been through enough of these pitches throughout my tenure that I’ve grown a sixth sense at cutting through the crap and getting down to what’s really important. When our agency first deployed Kenshoo, we were excited about the possibility, but still guarded about setting expectations that were unachievable.

Well after 90 days of using the tool, I’m afraid I might sound like the very sales pitches I warned you about in the first paragraph. In my opinion, Kenshoo is simply the most effective way to manage your search campaigns, period. Kenshoo has allowed us to scale our international search efforts without scaling our team. Before we ventured down the road of bid management, our team was reaching a ceiling of what was possible for our current staff. There just weren’t enough hours in the day, and the thought of scaling to a larger buy without more people was daunting. We explored the efficiencies that Kenshoo brought to the table right away. We were relentless in our ramp up education, and we quickly found hours in productivity that previously escaped us. Updating landing page URLs, ad copy, adjusting bids, initiating new campaigns, and managing our placements became streamlined with Kenshoo Enterprise.

Fast forward to today and I can say our ROI is better because of Kenshoo’s performance optimization (KPO) utility. I can say our billable hours are more efficient for our clients because of the gains in efficiency we’ve realized.

While I am sure Marin and Adobe have strong products, it was ultimately this report by Forrester that influenced our decision. 4 months in, we don’t have any regrets and we’re pleased with where our search initiatives are headed.

If you’re on the fence about utilizing Kenshoo in your organization, I’d be happy to share our results and even a few tips on how you can ramp up quickly. Just drop a note in the comments, we’d be happy to help.

Figuring Out if Those Ads Really Work – Part 1

By | ecommerce, Search Engine Marketing | No Comments

“Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half.” – John Wanamaker, the Father of Modern Advertising

In a nation where $39,000,000,000 is spent annually on online advertising alone; guessing whether or not those display, remarketing and pay-per-click ads are working just doesn’t cut it anymore. You can slice and dice your web analytics data any number of ways, from ROI to CPA to CPC to OPP*, to try and evaluate the performance of those ads, but those don’t always quite capture the big picture.

So what’s a marketer supposed to do?

My favorite way to leverage all of the information we have accessible and make data-driven decisions is the Effective Cost-Per-Acquisition and Return on Investment.

Step 1: Identify the TRUE goal of the ad.

Take a look at this pay-per-click ad on the term “brown knee high boots size 5″

The way I see it, the goal of the ad is to get new visitors to the Acme Boutique to buy brown knee high boots. Sure, if the person coming to the site buys jackets, earrings and pants – great! But, the copy is just centered around selling boots.

Why just new visitors though? Well, the whole point of a campaign where you bid on generic, non-brand terms is get awareness out to users who may not have previously heard about the Acme Boutique.

Whenever you have online advertising, you run the risk of having customers who are already familiar with your brand (This doesn’t apply to remarketing campaigns which are another beast), click on your ad as a means to quickly get to your site. There you go wasting money on people who would’ve come to your site anyway.

Step 2: Evaluate the ad performance.

Now that you have outlined what the goal of the ad is, you can accurately evaluate if the ad is getting the job done.

Let’s say that ad cost you $1,000 to run and you made $10,000 in revenue from 100 transactions. With traditional ROI calculations, you’d say you have a 900% ROI and be done, but what about the big picture?

What if I said that only 25 of those transactions were from people who were new visitors to the site and only $4,000 was spent on shoes? Would you say the ad accomplished its goals then?


The effective return-on-investment is only 300% then.


The effective cost-per-acquisition is $40.

Step 3: Make relevant, data-driven decisions about the ad.

So now that you have different numbers, what do they mean and how can you use them? The effective CPA and ROI metrics are a more accurate gauge on if the ads you’re investing in are effectively doing what you intend them to and can point you in the right direction to further investigate your marketing strategy. With more insight into the performance of the ads, you can combine this knowledge with other critical elements of your business.

  • If your business runs on lead-generation, you can start to figure out how much each lead is worth to your organization and how much to invest towards lead-generation campaigns based on these new metrics.
  • If you’re selling specific products, you can evaluate if you’re advertising the right products in the right places to the right people. If you’re advertising boots and everyone is buying jackets, imagine what your click-through and conversion rates could be if you were advertising what they were actually shopping for.
  • It might be a start to figuring out if your paid search campaigns are starting to eat into your organic traffic and cannibalizing your business. If it turns out the majority of your users are already familiar with your brand, the effective CPA will make a case for discontinuing advertising on those particular keywords or ads.
  • If you know have a good grasp on what the margins on your products are, you can evaluate really quickly if you’re making/losing money on your advertising efforts.

The metrics are just some of the key performance indicators we use to evaluate how our campaigns are doing. Plug the numbers into an Excel sheet and see if they might work for your business model.

Now that you know how to calculate the effective ROI and CPA of your campaigns, look for our next blog post in this three part series on how to use those metrics to build revenue forecasting models to predict how additional investment in online advertising will actually add to your bottom line.

* Just kidding, OPP isn’t a real marketing term. Just making sure you’re paying attention.

Figuring Out if Those Ads Really Work

“Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half.”

-John Wanamaker, the Father of Modern Advertising

In a nation where $39,000,000,000 is spent annually[1] on online advertising alone; guessing whether or not those display, remarketing and pay-per-click ads are working just doesn’t cut it anymore. You can slice and dice your web analytics data any number of ways, from ROI to CPA to CPC to OPP[2], to try and evaluate the performance of those ads, but those don’t always quite capture the big picture.

So what’s a marketer supposed to do?

My favorite way to leverage all of the information we have accessible and make data-driven decisions is the Effective Cost-Per-Acquisition and Return on Investment.

Step 1: Identify the TRUE goal of the ad.

Take a look at this fake ad for a fake client:Take a look at this pay-per-click ad on the term “brown knee high boots size 5″

Text Box: <Insert a fake ad for the Acme Boutique for shoesbrown knee high boots.>

The way I see it, the goal of the ad is to get new visitors to the Acme Boutique to buy shoesbrown knee high boots. Sure, if the person coming to the site buys jackets, earrings and pants – great! But, the banner copy is just centered around sellingis an ad for shoesboots.

Why just new visitors though? Well, the whole point of the a campaign where you bid on generic, non-brand terms is get awareness out to users who may not have previously heard about the Acme Boutique.

Whenever you have online advertising, you run the risk of having customers who are already familiar with your brand[3], click on your ad as a means to quickly get to your site. There you go wasting money on people who would’ve come to your site anyway.

Step 2: Evaluate the ad performance.

Now that you have outlined what the goal of the ad is, you can accurately evaluate if the ad is getting the job done.

Let’s say that ad cost you $1,000 to run and you made $10,000 in revenue from 100 peopletransactions. With traditional ROI calculations, you’d say you have a 900% ROI and be done, but what about the big picture?

What if I said that only 25 of those transactions were from people who were new visitors to the site and only $4,000 were was spent on shoes? Would you say the ad accomplished its goals then?

Text Box: <Insert Graphic that illustrates effective ROI>  (Shoe Revenue-Cost of Ad)/Cost of Ad ($4000-$1000)/$1000

The effective return-on-investment is only 300%[N1] then.

Text Box: <Insert Graphic that illustrates effective CPA>  (Shoe Revenue-Cost of Ad)/Cost of AdCost/Number of Transactions from New Visitors) $($4000-$1000)/$1000/25

The effective cost-per-acquisition is $40.

Step 3: Make relevant, data-driven decisions about the ad.

So now that you have different numbers, what do they mean and how can you use them? The effective CPA and ROI metrics are a more accurate gauge on if the ads you’re investing in are effectively doing what you intend them to and can point you in the right direction to further investigate your marketing strategy. With more insight into the performance of the ads, you can combine this knowledge with other critical elements of your business.

  • If your business runs on lead-generation, you can start to figure out how much each lead is worth to your organization and how much to invest towards lead-generation campaigns based on these new metrics.
  • If you’re selling specific products, you can evaluate if you’re advertising the right products in the right places to the right people. If you’re advertising boots and everyone is buying jackets, imagine what your click-through and conversion rates could be if you were advertising what they were actually shopping for.
  • It might be a start to figuring out if your paid search campaigns are starting to eat into your organic traffic and cannibalizing your business. If it turns out the majority of your users are already familiar with your brand, the effective CPA will make a case for discontinuing advertising on those particular keywords or ads.
  • If you know have a good grasp on what the margins on your products are, you can evaluate really quickly if you’re making/losing money on your advertising efforts.

The metrics are just some of the key performance indicators we use to evaluate how our campaigns are doing. Plug the numbers into an Excel sheet and see if they might work for your business model.

Now that you know how to calculate the effective ROI and CPA of your campaigns, look for our next blog post on how to use those metrics to build revenue forecasting models to predict how additional investment in online advertising will actually add to your bottom line.

Maybe you’re advertising the wrong product in the wrong place to the wrong people.

Numbers are just a start to point you in the right direction.

Margin

Acquisition value

Who is this for? Not all business models, but maybe yours.Numbers are just a start to point you in the right direction.


[2] Just kidding, OPP isn’t a real marketing term. Just making sure you’re paying attention.

[3] (This doesn’t apply to remarketing campaigns which are another a whole ‘nother beast.)


[N1]Make the ROI smaller to ‘surprise’ the user more.

Why adCenter is a Hydrox Cookie

By | digital marketing, ecommerce, google, Search Engine Marketing | 2 Comments

Preface: Hydrox cookies are like an Oreo cookie, but not nearly as good. I thought everyone would know this, but my editor Denise was puzzled. Please comment if you know what a Hydrox cookie is.

For the longest time Microsoft adCenter has been a Hydrox cookie to me, nothing but an Oreo cookie imitator. By that I mean while I recognize that Hydrox exists, and though people say that it is the same as an Oreo, clearly it is not. As comedian Gary Gullman once said, “The motto for Hydrox cookies should be ‘Hydrox by mistake,’ because that is the only time that you ever buy them.”

I used to have similar feelings about Microsoft adCenter. I recognized that adCenter existed, but when a client said they said they wanted to advertise on AdCenter, what they really meant was that they wanted to advertise on Google – “AdCenter by mistake.

Microsoft adCenter’s system was ridiculous to use, the traffic was low, and for some unknown reason you could only use it with IE. I had lost quite a bit of faith in Microsoft, as they seemed like knock-off artists. What was the Zune but the Hydrox cookie of iPods, what was Bing but the Hydrox cookie of Google search, and what was adCenter but the Hydrox cookie of Google AdWords?

Recently my views have changed.

I kept reading blogs and watching webinars that mentioned all of Microsoft’s new technology with regard to adCenter and (I can’t believe I am going to write this) the reviews were actually pretty good! The reviews were good in ways that are important to me and my client such as: dramatically better ROI, and great keyword research tools. According to a webinar I watched by Trada users on Bing spend an average of 6% more than those who are on Google.  Additionally, Microsoft improved the interface and I can now use it on my Mac. I decided to give it another try and here are my thoughts:

Where I was impressed:

  • Bing Ads Editor – This looks and functions like a zombie version of AdWords desktop editor. However, once you get the hang of it, the interface is equally easy to use and very similar to AdWords Editor. I really enjoy that I can perform keyword research right from the interface and that it was so easy to initially import Google AdWords Campaigns directly into the editor without needing to upload them. I think Microsoft really took some time putting this together and it works as it should. Making bulk changes is easy, and I found it intuitive.
  • Microsoft Ad Intelligence – My favorite part of the Bing ecosystem. I found many of the features to be extremely useful for keyword research such as:
    • Webpage keywords – This feature allows you to type in a keyword and it will spit out a list of suggestions. This was extremely useful, especially during ninja-like PPC research on competitors. This is no replacement for Keyword spy, but it helped me discover some new keywords from both my sites and my competitors.
    • Searches with your keyword –  This feature allows you to input a keyword and it will give you a list of searches that contain your keyword. I liked how this feature expanded keywords I already had. The rate of words I would use is not particularly high (maybe 2 useful ones for every 20 searched), but it did provide me with keywords to go after that I had not found elsewhere.
    • Keyword performance – This feature looks at historical data from other advertisers and uses it to predict clicks, impressions, click through rates, average bid, and more. Solid at predicting the cost I will incur and click through rate that I will enjoy. This is more robust than adWords and I found it to be slightly more accurate.
  • The quality of the searchers – Microsoft’s searchers are motivated to buy. ROI on all my campaigns, including ones that exactly mirror AdWords have a higher ROI. I am not sure exactly why this is, but I have theories. Some of my theories are: there is less competition in the adCenter system, searchers with Bing are older and have more money, or that Bill Gates himself is buying all the products in an effort to keep the ROI high on Microsoft adCenter.

Where adCenter has a lot of growing up to do:

  • Support – Not the customer service respondents who work at Bing, but actually trying to find tutorials, overviews, or papers. For example, Microsoft linking to dead support pages, outdated information, and overviews that are more sales than information. Additionally I could not find a good video tutorial. Try it and you will see. The best Microsoft Ad Intelligence tutorial I could find was about two minutes long. There is a learning center, but you can expect a bunch of videos that look like poorly put together power points which are short on information. This really needs to be addressed if they want advertisers to learn and evangelicalize their system.
  • Traffic – I am not entirely blaming Microsoft for this because it was expected. However, with claims of over 25% of all searches performed I expected more impressions and searches.  They are surprisingly low on impressions and when I called an adCenter rep they basically said, “We’re not Google!”

Overall I would never switch from adWords entirely, but if you have the time and the money I believe it is worth putting a portion of your ad spend in adCenter. Once you get over the hump of learning it, AdCenter can be a valuable tool which should increase your reach and ROI.

*Editors Note: I do know what a Hydrox Cookie is!

Big three stories of the week!

By | apps, digital marketing, ecommerce, facebook, interactive marketing, mobile marketing, Search Engine Marketing, search engine optimization, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Though Friday the 13th is generally considered an unlucky day, it is Friday and it can’t really be that bad. Here is the weekly round up of the top tech stories that you can’t miss this week. One story will affect your search engine optimization plans, one will effect your holiday shopping next year, and the final will make you rethink about mobile marketing.

1. Google launches “search plus your world”

Google continues its move to social networking dominance by launching “Google search plus your world”. Now, we all know that Google is the undisputed king when it comes to search, and we have all been watching as they awkwardly try to transition into social networking. It reminds me of when Eddie Murphy was the king of stand up comics and for some reason awkwardly tried to transition into being a singer. We all knew he was really good at one thing, and yet he had to try singing. But I digress. Google is launching “Search plus your world” for Google plus members which should benefit those social networkers who have become part of the Google Plus network. Google search plus your world will enable the user to search across both the wider internet that Google traditionally provides search results for as well as across your social network (Google Plus only). There is a little toggle switch at the top so you can choose between the two if you like. Here is an example of how it works:  you type in something like “Pizza” (My favorite search query) you will get both the traditional results, along with results that show your friends eating pizza, or pizza recipes they share. Here is Google’s video that shows the new social networking features in the search engine. For privacy purposes these social features will only appear if they are shared with you or if the post is public. Additionally Google will add the image results to your search so you will see both the images Google traditionally has in its index as well as images of your social circle. We will keep an eye on it because the Google search plus your world will definitely begin to effect search engine optimization efforts.

2. Consumer Electronics show

The CES is where the latest and greatest in all things electronic are released. If you don’t know what it is, it is basically what happens when a nerd goes to heaven. I didn’t get to go this year, but I did get to read about these great new gadgets:

  • 3D printer – This is just so amazing. Instead of printing on paper it prints on plastic, and the printer bring what is on the computer screen to life. I saw a video and it was able to “print” a flute, a replica of a person, a mannequin head, a toothbrush, and a shoe. Now, I don’t want any of those items per say but the possibilities are endless. I can see this increasingly being used for ecommerce.
  • Lenovo Yoga – Both a laptop and a tablet this is one very cool machine.  It is a laptop that can fold back and become a tablet, or fold over and become a stand to watch movies or TV on. The part that I like the best is that it has both the functionality of a tablet with screen based movements as well the laptops processing power and keyboard. It would be so nice not to need a laptop and tablet separately.

3. Are apps more important than search on mobile?

I saw the link to this article on Danny Sullivan’s facebook wall and thought it was worth taking a read. It brought up some valuable points about how people use and search on their mobile devices as compared to how they use apps on their mobile devices. Some main points that I took away from the article are:

  • Mobile users may be searching the web less than we think and are instead searching the app store.
  • Whereas a mobile website may be browsed momentarily, an app is on the phone and will be opened again and again. This means repeat traffic
  • Consumers interacting with apps show more brand favorability and purchase intent.

Articles like this continue to show that the cutting edge of the digital revolution is in mobile, and the playing field will continue to change

Those are the big three stories for the week – have a great weekend!

SEO For The Ones Who Don’t Know

By | blogging, community management, Conversational Marketing, customer experience, digital campaigns, digital marketing, Digital Operative, email marketing, facebook, geekery, google, link building, Search Engine Marketing, search engine optimization, twitter | 3 Comments

Optimizing your site using the right approach,
Is the subject I’m going to broach.
There are certain things you should implement during this process
If you follow these basic steps, you should expect nothing less.
Your site will optimize without a doubt,
If you follow this route.

Keywords and phrases is where you want to start.
If you don’t do your research, this is where you and I should part.
Pick the ones that focus on your niche.
General phrases will probably make a glitch
Pick specific words that compete with fewer sites,
Eventually you’ll stop beating your head like you do most nights.

Title Tags, Meta Tags and content should be a priority on your list.
Whoever manages these things, you should threaten with your fist.
Probably the most important factor in organic SEO.
Pay no attention to this and I’m certain your site will be a no go.
Keyword density should be between 3-5%.
Avoid Keyword stuffing, that’s what I meant.
Your content should have a natural flow.
Make sure you’ve added enough keywords though.
Each page of your site should have its own Title Tag.
This is not an area you want to treat like an old rag.
Tags should be built around keywords specific to a page.
Even Meta Tags count, even though it’s not all the rage.

Inbound link development is an important step.
Don’t fight this. It’s something you should just accept.
This is probably the most difficult and time consuming technique,
But it’s a good long term strategy. Wink, wink!
Factors that influence your rankings are,
Relevancy of the site linking back to you shouldn’t be sub-par,
And the anchor text to your sites link,
Can surely make you sink.
Do your research to partner with sites that will benefit you.
You’ll thank me once you realize this is not just a rue.

Your goal is to increase the number of visitors and leads,
By giving Google’s bot what it needs.
The search engines top 10 ranking is where you want to be.
It won’t happen by begging on your knees.
Getting pages indexed in each major search engine is tough,
But if you follow my steps, it might just be enough.

Like what you see? Contact us for a quote. Get Quote